All posts by yesteryear

How to Beat Rock-Paper-Scissors – Improve Your Odds of Winning the Game.

How to Beat Rock-Paper-Scissors - Improve Your Odds of Winning the game.

Rock-Paper-Scissors is suppose to be a zero-sum hand game with a 1 in 3 chance of winning any given round, but is it really a game of chance?

The zero-sum game characterization is based on the assumption that the weapon (rock, paper or scissors) is chosen at random. Most real life experiments will show that, on average, players tend to chose each weapon about a third of the time.
However, who is to say that there is no pattern in the order of the weapon choice?

If players continuously or subconsciously use a predictable strategy to play the game then that’s a weakness that can be exploited.
 
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U.S. Supreme Court Case “Coeur Alaska v. S.E. Alaska Conservation Council” – Opinion Announcement – June 22, 2009

John G. Roberts, Jr.:

Justice Kennedy has our opinion this morning in case 07-984, Coeur Alaska, Inc. versus Southeast Alaska Conservation Council and the consolidated case.

Anthony M. Kennedy:

These cases require us to decide whether a plan to dispose of mining waste violates the Clean Water Act.
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How to Move to Canada

The United Nations ranks Canada as one of the best countries to live in the world. 250,000 people move to Canada every year. If you wish to be one of those people, here are the steps you’ll need to take.

How to move to Canada

Step 1 – Eligibility

Check your eligibility to move to Canada on Canada’s government website.
Some people are not allowed to come to Canada. They are known as “inadmissible” under Canada’s immigration law.
Inadmissibility reasons include:
– Security risk.
– Human or international rights violations.
– Criminal conviction, or committing an act outside of Canada that would be a considered a crime in Canada.
– Ties to organized crime.
– Serious health problems.
– Serious financial problems.
– Misrepresentation on the application or in an interview.
– Not meeting the conditions in Canada’s immigration law.
– Relative that is not allowed into Canada.

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